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Many students who work while in college find that employment can provide many benefits, including offsetting the financial burden of higher education and gaining practical experience and skills to use throughout their careers. Research also suggests that student employment can contribute to the academic success of students. The below information can be utilized to better understand working IUPUI students, as well as student employment on a national scope.

Student Employment at IUPUI

Institutional research and data sources at IUPUI show that:

  • Approximately 75% of IUPUI students work, whether on or off campus.
  • Roughly 23% of student respondents to the 2013 IUPUI Continuing Student Survey who are working indicated they hold two or more jobs.
  • Approximately 60% of student respondents to the 2014 IUPUI Continuing Student Survey who are employed work exclusively off campus.
  • Respondents to the 2014 IUPUI Continuing Student Survey who are employed on campus work primarily 1–15 hours per week (57%).
  • Approximately 2,500 IUPUI students work on campus in hourly (temporary) positions at any given time, and 3,000 students work on campus each semester.
  • The average wage rate for student positions (temporary) on campus is approximately $10.50 per hour.
  • IUPUI students work in nearly all 17 schools on campus and in more than 140 individual departments.
  • The average GPA of IUPUI students working on campus is 3.19.

The 2015 Student Employee Survey of undergraduate IUPUI students working on campus in hourly and work-study roles shows that:

  • 87.9% of respondents agree or strongly agree their on-campus job has helped them develop skills and/or learn new skills
  • 87.5% of respondents agree or strongly agree being a student employee at IUPUI has positively impacted their overall college experience
  • 75.7% of respondents agree or strongly agree their on campus job has helped them understand workplace expectations and professionalism
  • 69.8% of respondents agree or strongly agree their job has helped them plan and prepare for their future career
  • 59% of respondents agree or strongly agree their job is directly related to their major and/or career interests
  • 44% of respondents agree or strongly agree being able to work on campus while attending IUPUI influenced their decision to stay enrolled at IUPUI

Student Employment Nationally—A Snapshot

  • Students who work 20 hours or less per week on campus specifically report higher levels of student engagement: level of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and supportive campus environment.
  • Retention rates are generally higher for students working 10–15 hours per week than those students who don’t work at all or who work more than 15 hours per week.
  • Students working on campus, rather than off campus, have been shown to have increased academic success.
  • Students working 20 hours or less per week on or off campus report roughly similar grades as those students who do not work.
  • Students working more than 20 hours per week on or off campus can have a negative impact on students’ grades.

References

IUPUI Continuing Student Satisfaction and Priorities (CSS) Research Brief. (2013). How is work impacting IUPUI undergraduates’ academics? A summary of results from the 2013 Continuing Student Survey. Retrieved from
http://crg.iupui.edu/Portals/133/PropertyAgent/15158/Files/679/Graunke-Research%20Brief%20Vol%20%2016%20No%20%202.pdf

IUPUI Continuing Student Survey University Summary Report. (2014). Retrieved from
http://osdae.iupui.edu/Portals/SDAE/Files/Documents/1_2014%20IUPUI%20Continuing%20Student%20Survey%20University%20Summary%20Report.pdf

IUPUI IUIE Data. (2014).

IUPUI Student Employee Survey. (2015).

Lederman, D. (2009). The impact of student employment. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/06/08/work

National Survey of Student Engagement. (n.d.). Benchmarks of effective educational practice. Retrieved from http://nsse.iub.edu/pdf/nsse_benchmarks.pdf

Perna, L. W. (2010). Understanding the working college student. American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/understanding-working-college-student#.VGo1TrG9_iZ

Perna, L. W. (2010). Understanding the working college student: New research and its implications for policy and practice. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Additional Research and Resources

Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (2015). Learning While Earning: The New Normal. Retrieved from https://cew.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/Working-Learners-Report.pdf

Lederman, D. (2009). The impact of student employment. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/06/08/work

Perna, L. W. (2010). Understanding the working college student. American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/understanding-working-college-student#.VGo1TrG9_iZ

Perna, L. W. (2010). Understanding the working college student: New research and its implications for policy and practice. Sterling, VA: Stylus.